A final quiz ー もう1つのクイズ

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iPhone photo day 117 - dry cake, anyone?

Since we have been enjoying quizzes for the past few days, I have decided to give you one last test. What do you suppose the above box contained? “Dry Cake” doesn’t sound like something one would normally spend money on, does it? Naturally, I examined the contents of the box, and found rather tasty cookies to be inside. I’ve never heard the terminology, but perhaps in Japan a dry cake is a cookie?
連続クイズが続きます。”Dry Cake” の意味はなんでしょうか?先日職場に上の写真のような箱が目に付きました。あら、賞味期限過ぎたケーキか、と思いました。なぜパサパサケーキを販売しているのだろうか?実は、ふたをあけてみると、美味しいクッキーが入っていました。(下の写真を参照)と言うことは、ドライケーキ=クッキー?
Today was a mini-one-day spring in Tokyo. High temps of 60F, 15C made cycling to work a pleasure. I believe I smell spring!
今日東京はミニ春だった。最高気温が16度以上。仕事場へサイクリングした時は大変快適だっが、明日はまた雨だそうです。まあ、間違いなく、春が近づいています。
(The photo below is of a “dry cake”)

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This entry was posted in Is it English? ~ 変な英語, Photography ~写真, Tokyo ~ 東京. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to A final quiz ー もう1つのクイズ

  1. Steve says:

    These look a bit like “Linzer Augen” minus the powdered sugar…while we’re on the subjec of “dry cake” and “wet cookies” in Japan, why are some cookies called “pie” as in the ubiquitous “unagi pie” and “leaf pie” souvenirs?

  2. audrey shaw says:

    I believe you are right. Plus it looks like a shortbread(we in America would call it) and they can be very dry. But are especially good with hot tea of your choice or a big glass of milk. Yummmm

  3. scotto says:

    That’s a good question. Seems to be some looseness in the terminology of sweets in Japan. Related to the fact that they adopted words from various languages?

  4. scotto says:

    Yes – let’s forget what they are and just eat some!

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